Home » I used to rest for only two hours, survive with no food, and endure beatings like ‘burukenge’: Meru lady shares as she leaves her Househelp Job in Saudi Arabia for Kenya

I used to rest for only two hours, survive with no food, and endure beatings like ‘burukenge’: Meru lady shares as she leaves her Househelp Job in Saudi Arabia for Kenya

by Paul Nyongesa
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In pursuit of a better life for her children, Evaline Mukiri ventured into the Gulf, only to find herself trapped in a nightmarish ordeal of exploitation and abuse.

As a single mother hailing from Meru county, Mukiri became the sole provider for her young daughters, aged below 10, in the hopes of securing a brighter future for them.

Mukiri’s journey took a dark turn when she began facing deplorable working conditions.

She revealed that her boss started mistreating her after she dared to inquire about her salary, receiving nothing but empty excuses in return.

What followed was a gradual degradation of her work environment, from a nine-hour rest to a mere two hours, coupled with an alarming reduction in meals – leaving her with just one meal per day, supper.

“I used to rest for nine hours, but it was slashed to seven, then six to three, and finally two. It was a gradual decrease. Also, I was only given one meal per day: supper. I could barely keep up as I would work for many hours non-stop. There was no time to rest, shower, eat, take water, or sleep because of the amount of work I was being given,” She said during an Interview with Tuko.co.ke.

The intensity of her workload left Mukiri with little time for basic necessities.

She narrated a heart-wrenching account of surviving on toilet water, as her boss forbade her from drinking water.

The situation became so dire that Mukiri, after four days without sustenance, resorted to making herself a cup of tea.

The boss, upon discovering this, reacted with fury, accusing Mukiri of depleting the sugar and milk supply.

“The boss was furious, saying sugar and milk had reduced. I told her I had not taken tea or drunk water. They had CCTV cameras in their house, so she had evidence of me drinking toilet water and making tea, ” she recalled.

The response was a brutal beating with a wire that lasted for hours, adding physical abuse to an already untenable situation.

Despite the abuse and her documents, ID, passport, and phone being confiscated by her employer, Mukiri mustered the courage to plan her escape.

The plight of Evaline Mukiri brings attention to the larger issue of migrant worker rights, shedding light on the need for comprehensive regulations and support mechanisms.

 

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